Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

Disrupting Health Professions Education…What we learned from this month’s #HMIChat

We had a lively discussion during this month’s #HMIChat about disruptive innovation focused on health professions education. We discussed many sustaining innovations as well, and highlighted the difference between the two. For those interested in reading more check out the pre-reading for the chat. Obviously, the @HarvardMacy and #MedEd community at large is eager to innovate, whether it be sustaining or disruptive and quite frankly we need both types!

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Gregg Wells

Med ed innovations must be con...

Medical education innovations need to be consistent with how humans learn in isolation and in groups. Individualized education po... Read More
Saturday, 01 September 2018 9:09 PM
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Behind the Curtain with Victoria Brazil: How hard can it be?

At the 2018 Program for Educators, faculty member Victoria Brazil led a professional development session for course faculty intended to prompt reflection on our career trajectories. Victoria asked a series of six questions to our faculty members, and we thought our Harvard Macy blog readers would enjoy hearing Victoria’s answers to the same questions.

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#MedEdPearls August 2018 - Questioning to assist in Supervision Levels and Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs)

What levels of supervision are required for physician trainees? This month’s #MedEdPearl focuses on faculty supervision levels using a prospective, summative entrustment scale that fosters physician trainee progression toward autonomy.  As trusting propensity is an important component in supervision and entrustment, ten Cate and colleagues have developed an easily understood model for communicating aspects of entrustment through level of supervision for trainee assessment. The model describes elements of progression and decision-making that can foster autonomy in the learner.  As a complement to ten Cate's model, the #MedEdPearls team offers the following questions to quickly assess the required level of supervision for a learner while encouraging learner growth.

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Pushing the Envelope: Ways Technology Can Extend the Limits of Possibility in Medical Education

The technology landscape has changed a great deal even since my first Harvard Macy blog post back in 2015. As computing power increases exponentially, we are seeing many of the technologies that were previously thought to be science fiction coming to fruition. Artificial intelligence, machine learning, neural networks, blockchain technology, augmented reality, virtual reality, and 3D printing are now making their way into common language outside of our higher education walls. Ever increasing attention has been given to technologies like augmented (AR) and virtual reality (VR), with new companies popping up every day and existing companies scrambling to expand their capabilities utilizing these technologies. In 2017 alone, venture capitalists poured over $3 billion dollars investing in AR and VR startups and the global healthcare AR/VR market is expected to hit $15 billion by 2026. Virtual and augmented reality headsets are free falling in price and rapidly hitting the consumer market with the HTC Vive and Facebook’s Oculus Rift falling from $800 in 2017 to $399-499 in 2018. Mobile based AR is rapidly gaining popularity as our everyday devices are now being supported by Apple’s ARkit and Google’s ARCore. Bringing these technologies to mobile devices will have huge implications in education and learning.

This post is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather a snapshot and examples of what technological capabilities are out there. Regardless of the technology, the adage ‘Content is King’ strongly resonates. One must remember that the technology will never make up for poor content or pedagogy. Although there is strong buzz around these technologies, I encourage everyone to be critical and see how the technology can actually add value or capabilities to the educational content without being the educational content itself. The best way to evaluate this is to ask yourself, ‘Could this content be made meaningful without this technology?’ For example, a virtual patient in VR may be cool, but are the interactions with the patient the same that could be had with much lower technology like a laptop or mobile device? In some instances, technology can actually add unnecessary cognitive load and detract from the learning experience.

This blog will detail technological advancements in the consumer and educational realm, and how medical educators are starting to use this technology to augment and, in some instances, replace existing learning experiences.

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#HMIchat July 2018 - What Image or Song Would You Choose?

For those of us in the United States, it was a special holiday version of #HMIchat on July 4th— a 24 hour asynchronous chat (no synchronous sessions this time)! Because July 1st marks the beginning of a new academic year here in the US, the focus was medical education goals for the 2018-2019 academic year. Personal, professional, and institutional medical education goals were all welcomed.

Despite the holiday, our @HarvardMacy community showed up to share & help! We shared goals such as: create a curriculum that is both sustainable and malleable, complete graduate training, learn about various education strategies, increase habits of self-care, and develop new research interests. Many of us struggle with how to move forward with a new goal. Fortunately, our community members shared several wonderful resources—here are just a few:

Great book for curriculum building, shared by Lonika Sood.

Great book for presenting the evidence in medical education, shared by Teresa Sörö.

How to write great multiple choice questions, shared by Teresa Sörö.

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