Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

Choosing Not to Learn: The Case of the Missing Students

Bella didn’t show up for her assigned clinics. Instead, without informing anyone, she joined her classmates in other clinics that were more interesting to her. Another time, Bella didn’t show up in any clinic at all (as confirmed by faculty). When Dr. Harvey confronted her on her attendance, she lied.

 Charles seemed to show interest in the specialty and engaged well with the patients. Then one day he didn’t show up at work. Afterwards, he emailed Dr. Harvey to explain that he had decided to self-study instead of see patients. Later, Dr. Harvey heard from an administrator that Charles had returned his hospital badge and submitted his feedback days before the usual end of the rotation date.

 On the last day of the rotation, Dr. Harvey held a meeting with the students. He wanted to understand why they were absent so frequently, seemed disinterested, and didn’t notify him of schedule changes.

 Bella said the greatest learning value came from seeing standardized patients and doing simulations, followed by attending lectures and tutorials. To her, seeing real patients had the lowest learning value. She further believed that observing faculty deal with ‘patient administrative matters', such as completing insurance forms, was not useful for her future career.

 Charles said he was focused on passing the summative exam at the end of the rotation. He saw attending patient clinics as optional.

...
Recent Comments
Gregg Wells

Some reasons for medical stude...

Ambrose's wonderful vignette illustrates many conflicts, tensions, and inconsistencies in medical education and, indeed, in medica... Read More
Wednesday, 04 July 2018 5:05 PM
C. Kim Stokes

Potentially problematic on bot...

This is a great and very realistic case scenario. Thank you for this! I think the problems could be two-fold. As for why the stude... Read More
Tuesday, 14 August 2018 1:01 AM
Continue reading
1051 Hits
2 Comments

#HMIchat June 2018 - What are We Really Teaching? Exploring The Hidden Curriculum.

Missed out on the June #HMIChat about the promises and perils of the hidden curriculum? In this post, we recap the key points from the conversation and further enhance our learning on the topic. 

Continue reading
865 Hits
0 Comments

What Can YOU Design?: Innovative Thinking in Medical Education

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine annual conference was packed full of thought-provoking sessions, including an interesting discussion on Design Thinking.

Continue reading
1102 Hits
0 Comments

What every healthcare manager should ask before hopping on the integration bandwagon

It’s rare to read past a healthcare headline these days without encountering the word “integration” in some phrase or other, from vertical or horizontal integration; to clinical, economic or data integration. And the word’s ubiquity makes sense. Everything about U.S. healthcare is complex, from the problems it’s required to solve and the fragmented “system” through which care is funded and delivered, to the regulations intended to promote care quality, cost effectiveness and access. So it’s intuitive that industry managers pursuing ambitious goals would strive to get people, processes and resources working in alignment toward them. 

Continue reading
848 Hits
0 Comments

We are all Leaders: What are you waiting for?

We are all leaders! Health care professionals, whether nurses, pharmacists, physicians, physical therapists, or others, are all leaders at different times. Health care is complex, and all of us must be humble enough to recognize that there are times when we should let someone else lead. While not all of us will take on formal leadership roles such as deans, department chiefs, or program directors, all of us will lead in some capacity. We will, at a minimum, lead our own clinical teams and, of course, our patients. Despite the fact that we are all going to be leaders, there remains a paucity of education dedicated to leadership development for entry level positions and, in particular, graduate medical education. While there are resources for those assuming titled leadership positions, for many who are leading on a daily basis there is a gap in leadership training. Moreover, we should not wait until people are put in positions of leadership to develop their leadership skills. This so-called accidental leadership (the leadership skills we learn simply by taking part in our jobs) development model needs to change.

Continue reading
1479 Hits
0 Comments