Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

Once a scholar, forever a scholar

Blog authors: Aida Darweish and Nouf (Nova) Al-Rumaihi

Attending Harvard Macy Institute courses brings a unique kind of excitement to those who attend, and this is a sentiment expressed by many faculty and scholars. As a scholar, the most striking part of Harvard Macy courses is creating a psychologically safe, positive learning environment. This optimizes learners’ interactions and has a tremendous effect on immediate and later outcomes of the learning process. In a safe learning environment, all learners can share their experiences and express their opinions without embarrassment at any point. The other thing that is unique about HMI courses is creating a community of practice where we are connected forever, where we receive advice and share thoughts from long life colleagues and friends from all over the world. They are always ready to help and collaborate on medical education projects.

Last summer, we attended the Harvard Macy Institute Leading Innovations in Health Care and Education course in Boston. As a result, we were asked by Margaret Hay (Educators ‘10, Assessment ‘10, Leaders ‘11) to serve as course faculty for the “Leadership and Innovation in Healthcare” course at the Monash Institute for Health and Clinical Education (MIHCE, Monash University, Australia). This course is a unique collaboration between the MICHE and the Harvard Macy Institute (Boston, USA), and was held in the United Arab Emirates in November 2017. We were amazed to meet so many dedicated educators and innovators from around the world including Australia, New Zealand, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United States, and United Arab Emirates. Indeed, we were no longer scholars, but now valuable members of the core faculty team!

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Is What You Know Wrong? The Cost of Knowledge Growth and Decay

“But what do I really need to know!?” asks the concerned student. Being the sage health professions educator you are, you respond with a turning of the table. “What would your patient would want you to know?”

Although seemingly glib, this axiom has helped guide the depth and breadth of curricula for decades. Health professions education has traditionally been defined largely by a student’s ability to compile and recall the voluminous amounts of knowledge necessary for the safe and effective practice of their discipline. What does this mean in the context of competency-based education? What happens when what was once true is now false?

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#MedEdPearls October 2018 - Microaggressions

Microaggressions are “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative . . . slights and insults” (Sue et al., 2007).

Microaggressions can have a macro affect, particularly when considering the cumulative burden for individuals and organizations over time. Microaggressions show up everywhere in society including in our classrooms, clinics, hallways, on social media, in our neighborhood watch app, and at the grocery store!

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Embracing Technology to Maximize Your Academic Productivity

As clinician educators, our time is increasingly limited. Often, we must balance competing roles as clinicians, teachers, and program administrators. On top of that, we are expected to produce scholarship as part of our institution’s academic mission and for career advancement. However, the increasing availability of technology provides new opportunities for scholarly output and dissemination. This post will highlight three strategies for using technology to maximize your scholarly output.

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Deploy team science principles to mend “silos” in academic medicine

Though it is difficult to predict the future, it is safe to say that collaborative, cross-disciplinary approaches to complex societal problems are here to stay. This is evidenced by team science, a collaborative and cross-disciplinary approach that has accomplished biomedical breakthroughs once considered impossible. Making the most of the opportunities that team science has to offer may seem fraught with the challenges of adapting from a solo-investigator culture to one of collaboration; however, new advances become possible through this methodology.

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