Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

Feedback PLeaSe! A #MedEdPearl from #IAMSE18

The Feedback PLeaSe model has three phases: Preparation, Listening, and Summarizing.  During the Preparation phase, the faculty facilitator announces the intention to conduct face-to-face feedback sessions, discuses effective behaviors, and provides a model to use when giving feedback. In the Listening phase, the presenters at the conference suggested using a model called the STAR model. STAR is an acronym that reminds learners that effective feedback is Specific, Timely, Actionable, and Received. Those providing feedback can use the STAR model to give one positive observation and one area for growth. The receiver is encouraged to listen while the facilitator takes notes to send at a later date. Finally, in the Summarizing phase, the receiver demonstrates active listening by giving a short verbal synthesis of key points of the observations.

During the session at the conference, the presenters shared anecdotal data from their experiences using the Feedback PLeaSe model. Additional qualitative and quantitative data is available in their article. They also led an excellent faculty development activity. During the activity, participants formed small groups and received a realistic scenario, assumed roles, and practiced conducting a face-to-face feedback session.

How do you prepare learners and faculty to provide effective feedback? Share your strategies at #MedEdPearls.

REFERENCES

Szarek JL. Medical Science Educator April Article Review http://www.iamse.org/medical-science-educator-april-article-review-from-dr-john-l-szarek/

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Seriously? A Board game?

Candy land. Monopoly. Life. Scrabble. Risk. These are the games that we played as children, but they often engaged us in a way that is the foundation for learning. Engagement, after all, is a crucial precursor to learning since it allows educators to gain a learner’s attention. Games, however, do not need to be built for fun – they can be serious too.

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Choosing Not to Learn: The Case of the Missing Students

Bella didn’t show up for her assigned clinics. Instead, without informing anyone, she joined her classmates in other clinics that were more interesting to her. Another time, Bella didn’t show up in any clinic at all (as confirmed by faculty). When Dr. Harvey confronted her on her attendance, she lied.

 Charles seemed to show interest in the specialty and engaged well with the patients. Then one day he didn’t show up at work. Afterwards, he emailed Dr. Harvey to explain that he had decided to self-study instead of see patients. Later, Dr. Harvey heard from an administrator that Charles had returned his hospital badge and submitted his feedback days before the usual end of the rotation date.

 On the last day of the rotation, Dr. Harvey held a meeting with the students. He wanted to understand why they were absent so frequently, seemed disinterested, and didn’t notify him of schedule changes.

 Bella said the greatest learning value came from seeing standardized patients and doing simulations, followed by attending lectures and tutorials. To her, seeing real patients had the lowest learning value. She further believed that observing faculty deal with ‘patient administrative matters', such as completing insurance forms, was not useful for her future career.

 Charles said he was focused on passing the summative exam at the end of the rotation. He saw attending patient clinics as optional.

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#HMIchat June 2018 - What are We Really Teaching? Exploring The Hidden Curriculum.

Missed out on the June #HMIChat about the promises and perils of the hidden curriculum? In this post, we recap the key points from the conversation and further enhance our learning on the topic. 

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What Can YOU Design?: Innovative Thinking in Medical Education

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine annual conference was packed full of thought-provoking sessions, including an interesting discussion on Design Thinking.

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