Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

Interactive Video Blog Series: Teaching Better with Technology with Dr. Neil Mehta

Solving the Problem of Opportunistic Learning in the Clinical Years with Google Docs - a strategy discussion with Dr. Neil Mehta and Dr. Elizabeth Armstrong


The clinical years of any health professional program can be a bit like the Wild Wild West. Students see patients in a variety of ambulatory and inpatient settings and the learning can be opportunistic. How do we ensure our learners are making progress and that their learning goals are achieved? In this video we discuss how an easy to use, widely available free tool can be adapted to support learning in the ambulatory clinical clerkship by following basic pedagogic principles. Dr's. Armstrong and Mehta discuss a problem faced by many clinician educators and describe a strategy of using Google Docs to solve the problem with great results as described by one of the students.  To learn more about this strategy and other technological solutions to common educational challenges, take our Educators 2.0 course with co-director Dr. Mehta.

Video length: 32 minutes.



The Harvard Macy Institute and OPENPediatrics have collaborated together to produce a series of interview-style videos on current and relevant medical education topics. OPENPediatrics is an online community of clinicians sharing best practices from all resource settings around the world through innovative collaboration and digital learning technologies.  For more information about OPENPediatrics, please visit http://openpediatrics.org.

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Comments 1

 
Admin User on Saturday, 28 May 2016 20:03
Useful discussion

I quite liked this format of presentation. 30 minutes is long enough to get into the weeds a bit in terms of the educational aspects, and with the data presented I could replicate (and may well) what Neil did. The linking to the main body of HMI knowledge was also a very welcome touch, and the presentation was well animated. Strong work.

James Hudspeth, Boston University, Boston

I quite liked this format of presentation. 30 minutes is long enough to get into the weeds a bit in terms of the educational aspects, and with the data presented I could replicate (and may well) what Neil did. The linking to the main body of HMI knowledge was also a very welcome touch, and the presentation was well animated. Strong work. James Hudspeth, Boston University, Boston
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Saturday, 04 April 2020