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#MedEdPearls December 2017 Sharing Stories

What’s your story: the power of narrative medicine?
Inspiration for this #MedEdPearls goes to @annieweisman1 & @dmullinsdms from their recent storytelling workshop at The Generalists in Medical Education.

 Storytelling is a communication method that has stood the test of time.  Its use in medical education is seen across the continuum to engender motivation to learn on topics across a diverse spectrum: empathy, well-being, professionalism, reflection, etc. 

The hook of this pedagogical practice is derived from the connection created between those in the dialogue and the level of listening needed in order to understand the meaning behind the words.  Every patient has a story and through these stories the element of humanistic medicine is found “physicians need the ability to listen to the narratives of the patient, grasp and honor their meanings, and be moved to act on the patients behalf” (Charon, 2001, p. 1897). 

Join the #MedEdPearls Twitter discussion to share your story on:

  1. How you are integrating storytelling in #MedEd?
  1. Is your #MedEd curriculum using narratives in any of the situations Charon (2001) explores: the physician and patient, the physician and colleague, the physician and self, and the physician and society?  

 Maybe you are looking at how to incorporate narrative medicine in your #meded curriculum?  Check out the MedEdPORTAL publication by Winkel (2006) on a writing workshop for residents.  

 

References:

Charon, R. (2001). Narrative medicine: A model for empathy, reflection, profession, and trust. JAMA, 286(15), p. 1897-1902.

Winkel, A. (2006). Narrative Medicine: A writing workshop curriculum for residents.MedEdPORTAL, retrieved from https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10493/

 

Author:
Carrie Bowler, MS, MLS (CM) | Program Manager – Staff Development |Assistant Professor |Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology

 

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Comments 1

 
Gregg Wells on Tuesday, 12 December 2017 16:45
Narrative medicine and cognitive bias

Story telling fits wonderfully into how the human brain learns and remembers and also interprets and predicts experiences. Stories, however, hold dangers related to cognitive bias. Every story only partially reflects reality and can only be partially generalized. When working through a diagnostic, preventative, or treatment puzzle with a patient or situation, a health care professional must be alert to cognitive biases that hinder the discovering of the correct story for that puzzle.

Beyond individual patients, working through puzzles to the correct story within a broader scope of the health care system requires similar caution about cognitive biases. Always think carefully!

Story telling fits wonderfully into how the human brain learns and remembers and also interprets and predicts experiences. Stories, however, hold dangers related to cognitive bias. Every story only partially reflects reality and can only be partially generalized. When working through a diagnostic, preventative, or treatment puzzle with a patient or situation, a health care professional must be alert to cognitive biases that hinder the discovering of the correct story for that puzzle. Beyond individual patients, working through puzzles to the correct story within a broader scope of the health care system requires similar caution about cognitive biases. Always think carefully!
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