Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

#HMIChat May 2018 on the Clinical Learning Environment

I’ll discuss each of these more in depth below. 

The first theme called attention to the importance of healthy interpersonal relationships. This discussion highlighted inter-professional relationships and the importance of trust and rapport between those working in the CLE. The necessity of clear and supportive communication strategies was also underscored here, ensuring the creation of safe learning environments that celebrate successes and foster a growth mindset culture within learning and work spaces. Designing learning environments in which there are communal, inter-professional work spaces or lounge spaces was a suggestion to encourage this community culture.

A second point of discussion was on the engagement of all stakeholders in the assessment and optimization of the CLE. This included patients and their families, inter-professional colleagues, and learners. In particular, the point on empowering learners resonated throughout the discussion as a valuable asset in improving the CLE. Speaking as an OBGYN resident, residency is a unique time in one’s medical career when we are gradually learning to take on more independence while still operating under a more experienced supervisor and teacher. We are truly entrenched in the CLE every day, and empowering learners (whether medical or nursing students, residents, registrars, or other trainees) to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of these environments is not only beneficial in the CLE QI process, but could also be beneficial for the learners’ sense of ownership over their continued learning. Co-production and co-leadership are buzz words that have been frequently cited in this capacity; concepts that restructure traditional decanal leadership into something more ‘horizontal’. These concepts can, of course, be applied to other stakeholder engagement as well, patients and inter-professionals included.

There were also some branching conversations around the various spaces in which we learn in medicine – consideration to in- versus out-patient settings, academic versus community hospitals, and time and workload pressures in different settings – and the cultures and climates that are so engrained within those spaces. There were some interesting discussions around the importance of ‘in-situ’ versus simulation center simulation and how best to integrate reflection and coaching into the learning environment.

Finally, there were a couple resources for assessment and diagnosis of the CLE that were frequently cited throughout this discussion.

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#HMIChat April 2018 - Learning Analytics, Promises and Perils

The April HMI chat focused on learning analytics, with a rich discussion on the exciting potential for these tools as well as some caveats regarding their use. This is an exciting new area in technology enhanced education. Many interesting questions and multiple engaging discussions happened during synchronous and asynchronous chats.

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Reflection on March 2018 HMIchat on Health Equity

This blog reflection is co-authored by Mobola Campbell-Yesufu and Christina Cruz

The March #HMIchat focused on health equity and social determinants of health. We kicked off the first synchronous hour with excited and engaged health professions educators sharing what health equity means to them. Over the course of the next 23 hours, including both synchronous sessions, we shared our experiences, challenges and future directions in teaching health equity. With almost 100 participants sending 500 plus tweets on this topic, we amassed a veritable treasure trove of teaching pearls during the chat. Here are the highlights:

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#HMIchat February 2018 – Let’s talk about trust - of the educator

#HMIchat February 2018 co-authors: Leslie Sheu (@lesliesheu), John Mahan (@MedEdMahan), Larry Hurtubise (@hur2buzy)

"I think to be an entrusted educator means that learners respect you, but also are not afraid to be themselves and be honest to you about their questions and needs." - Lindsey Smith (@DrLindseyMSmith)

We were thrilled that trust was the topic of this month’s #HMIchat, and were astounded to learn that this chat brought together 118 medical educators from around the world (including physicians, physician assistants, nurses, and researchers) across multiple specialties (including medicine, surgery, emergency medicine, ICU, physiatry, and pathology, to name a few).

We came out of the chat reinvigorated with thoughts on how to improve our own work and entrustability as educators, ideas on how to study or think about trust in a broader context, and ways to challenge our current framework. We thought we would frame our key take-aways around the 5 factors of trust (watch this video by Justin Kreuter (@kreuterMD) for a great summary!):

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Design Thinking in Health Professions Education - reflections on our January #HMIChat

Authors: HMI Chat team

 This #HMIchat moderated by Jeff Wong (@jwonguprcmeded) and Mark Stephens (@mbstephensmd), from Penn State Hershey (@PennStHershey), in January 2018 focused on #DesignThinking in medical education (#MedEd) and health professions education (#HPE). This topic especially hit home with the HMI Chat team (@teresasoro @kreutermd and me (@erhall1)) given #DesignThinking is grounded in “abductive logic” which facilitates a growth mindset of “what might be” rather than “what might have been.” The @HarvardMacy #HMIChat community wholeheartedly embraces a “what might be” approach and imagines the possibilities as we wrestle with hot topics in medical education with subject matter experts and international colleagues. 

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