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#MedEdPearls

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#MedEdPearls Team:



  • Jean Bailey – Central Michigan University College of Medicine

  • Carrie Bowler – Mayo Clinic

  • Diane Brown –  Medical College of Wisconsin

  • Megan Haak – Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hosptitals

  • Larry Hurtubise (HCE2.0 '16) – Nationwide Children's Hospital The Ohio State University

  • Machelle Linsenmeyer  – West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

  • Linda Love – University of Nebraska Medical Center

  • Leah Sheridan – The Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

  • Mark Terrell – Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

Assessing Clinical Reasoning: Identifying the GAP

At the end of a case presentation, you ask your learner “what’s the patient diagnosis?”, and you think to yourself “what’s the learner diagnosis?” 

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#MedEdPearls October 2018 - Microaggressions

Microaggressions are “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative . . . slights and insults” (Sue et al., 2007).

Microaggressions can have a macro affect, particularly when considering the cumulative burden for individuals and organizations over time. Microaggressions show up everywhere in society including in our classrooms, clinics, hallways, on social media, in our neighborhood watch app, and at the grocery store!

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#MedEdPearls September 2018 - A different approach to questioning

Looking for a quick, engaging activity for your course? Try a slightly different approach to using questions that facilitates peer instruction, promotes deeper learning, and allows for knowledge application. Similar to Team-based Learning, this activity can also give student teams an opportunity to provide rationale for their responses while also providing you feedback on how well students are understanding the material.

Recent Comments
Guest — Tiffany Tsang

great article

great article
Tuesday, 11 September 2018 7:07 PM
Lori R. Newman

Interesting

Great article and an interesting way to assess your learners' knowledge and engage in peer teaching.
Tuesday, 02 October 2018 12:12 AM
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#MedEdPearls August 2018 - Questioning to assist in Supervision Levels and Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs)

What levels of supervision are required for physician trainees? This month’s #MedEdPearl focuses on faculty supervision levels using a prospective, summative entrustment scale that fosters physician trainee progression toward autonomy.  As trusting propensity is an important component in supervision and entrustment, ten Cate and colleagues have developed an easily understood model for communicating aspects of entrustment through level of supervision for trainee assessment. The model describes elements of progression and decision-making that can foster autonomy in the learner.  As a complement to ten Cate's model, the #MedEdPearls team offers the following questions to quickly assess the required level of supervision for a learner while encouraging learner growth.

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Feedback PLeaSe! A #MedEdPearl from #IAMSE18

The Feedback PLeaSe model has three phases: Preparation, Listening, and Summarizing.  During the Preparation phase, the faculty facilitator announces the intention to conduct face-to-face feedback sessions, discuses effective behaviors, and provides a model to use when giving feedback. In the Listening phase, the presenters at the conference suggested using a model called the STAR model. STAR is an acronym that reminds learners that effective feedback is Specific, Timely, Actionable, and Received. Those providing feedback can use the STAR model to give one positive observation and one area for growth. The receiver is encouraged to listen while the facilitator takes notes to send at a later date. Finally, in the Summarizing phase, the receiver demonstrates active listening by giving a short verbal synthesis of key points of the observations.

During the session at the conference, the presenters shared anecdotal data from their experiences using the Feedback PLeaSe model. Additional qualitative and quantitative data is available in their article. They also led an excellent faculty development activity. During the activity, participants formed small groups and received a realistic scenario, assumed roles, and practiced conducting a face-to-face feedback session.

How do you prepare learners and faculty to provide effective feedback? Share your strategies at #MedEdPearls.

REFERENCES

Szarek JL. Medical Science Educator April Article Review http://www.iamse.org/medical-science-educator-april-article-review-from-dr-john-l-szarek/

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What Can YOU Design?: Innovative Thinking in Medical Education

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine annual conference was packed full of thought-provoking sessions, including an interesting discussion on Design Thinking.

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#MedEdPearls May 2018 - Flipping with TBL

Flipping the classroom with team-based learning (TBL) is becoming common practice in medical education.  Key to its success as a learner-centered teaching strategy is its scalability to large classrooms through the employment of high-performing learner teams, requiring less faculty time/numbers compared to other learner-centered strategies such as problem-based or case-based learning.  Individual learners are motivated to come to class prepared by both a readiness assurance process (i.e., quiz) and team accountability.  Class time is then focused on application of knowledge through problem solving and clinical reasoning. 

Compared to traditional teaching strategies such as lecture, TBL not only significantly increases knowledge scores1, but also offers opportunities for developing and measuring competencies of contemporary healthcare such as professionalism, communication, team work, and even team reflexivity2. As a pedagogical framework, TBL further facilitates integration of additional teaching strategies3 to optimize learning, retention, and teaching satisfaction.  As an opportunity for scholarship, there is a dearth of flipped classroom literature reporting measurement of outcomes other than knowledge gains.  So why not flip for TBL?

Check out the TBL Collaborative, MedEdPortal, or the following resources to get started!

  1. Fatmi M, Hartling L, Hillier T, Campbell S, Oswald AE. The effectiveness of team-based learning on learning outcomes in health professions education: BEME Guide No. 30. Med Teach. 2013. Nov;35:1608-1624. Doi: 10.3109/0142159X.2013.849802. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24245519
  2. Schmutz JB, Kolbe M, Eppich WJ. Twelve tips for integrating team reflexivity into your simulation-based team training. Med Teach. 2018. Apr:1-7. doi: 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1464135.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29703126
  3. Domans D, Michaelsen L, van Merrienboer J, van der Vleuten C. Should we choose between problem-based learning and team-based learning? No, combine the best of both worlds! Med Teach. 2015. Apr;39(4):354-359. doi: 10.3109/0142159X.2014.948828. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25154342 

Leah Sheridan, PhD, is a medical educator in physiology. Leah currently holds a position as Associate Lecturer at Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. Leah’s areas of professional interest include teaching effectiveness, assessment for learning, and pedagogy. Leah can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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#MedEdPearls April 2018 - 21st Century Scholarship from #theCGEA

#theCGEA 2018 conference in Rochester Minnesota was hosted by @mayoFacDev. There were schools like @OhioStatemed and scholars like @stanhamstra. Publications @JournalofGME, @MedEdPORTAL and @TLMedEd were represented, editors like @anna_cianciolo and @debsimpson3  participated.
 
The first 279 characters of this #MedEdPearl demonstrate the proliferation of social media in medical education #SoMe. During these times of unfavorable news about social media one pearl was reiterated by #SoMe scholars  like Daniel Cabrera (@CabreraERDR) and power users like Gary Beck Dallaghan (@GLBDallaghan) at @theCGEA:
 
Whether your interest is teaching, research or patient education, determine your purpose and intended audience before using social media.  Let your goals drive your decisions about platform, strategies and connections.
 
The University of Nebraska Medical Center hosts a blog with several useful articles about #SoMe at https://connected.unmc.edu/category/social-media/    It includes a quick start, Lingo, Tips to Grow Your Twitter Followers, Common  Mistakes, Tweet Chats, and the power of using twitter at conferences.
 
Share the #SoMe resources do you recommend at #MedEdPearls
 
Larry Hurtubise @hur2buzy and  
Linda Love @2LindaMLove
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#MedEdPearls March 2018 - "Frame-Based" Feedback

A main learning component of skills and competencies is feedback.   As instructors, when a learner makes a mistake, we jump to the conclusion we know why the learner erred without inquiring about the learner’s thought-processes. “Frame-based” feedback is a strategy to avoid this feedback error and to teach more effectively and efficiently. In an excellent article* about frame-based feedback the authors suggests three quick steps to provide effective feedback while avoiding our own cognitive biases: 1) Provide initial and specific feedback on what you observed; 2) Inquire as to what the learner’s ‘frame of mind’ was; 3) match teaching points with the learner’s frames.

While no one wants to make a mistake and no one wants their mistake pointed out to them, without constructive feedback the learner loses opportunities to improve. As we continue to move toward milestones and competencies in assessment for medical education, we should focus on providing formative feedback to our learners.  

 
Reference:

Rudolph J, Raemer D, Shapiro J. We know what they did wrong, but not why: the case for 'frame-based' feedback. Clin Teach. 2013 Jun;10(3):186-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1743-498X.2012.00636.x

 

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#MedEdPearls February 2018 - Dialogue-Structured Learning Tasks

The medical education environment offers a variety of opportunities for dialogue education learning tasks.  Dialogue education is an intentional design framework that fosters communication, reflection, and community in the learning environment.   Using this framework, educators can structure dialogue with students through learning experiences or “tasks” designed to assess prior knowledge, introduce new content, give learners a chance to practice, and thenhelp them integrate the new knowledge or skill (Vella, 2000).   Jane Vella’s concept of learning task design includes what she refers to as the 4 I’s: 

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#MedEdPearls January 2018 Reflective Practice

Reflective Practice:  Your BEST Professional Development Tool

With the start of a new year and scores of self-improvement resolutions underway, what better time to think about resources to help attain your goals and avoid barriers that might impede success in your self-improvement efforts.

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#MedEdPearls December 2017 Sharing Stories

What’s your story: the power of narrative medicine?
Inspiration for this #MedEdPearls goes to @annieweisman1 & @dmullinsdms from their recent storytelling workshop at The Generalists in Medical Education.

 Storytelling is a communication method that has stood the test of time.  Its use in medical education is seen across the continuum to engender motivation to learn on topics across a diverse spectrum: empathy, well-being, professionalism, reflection, etc. 

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Gregg Wells

Narrative medicine and cogniti...

Story telling fits wonderfully into how the human brain learns and remembers and also interprets and predicts experiences. Storie... Read More
Tuesday, 12 December 2017 10:10 PM
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#MedEdPearls November 2017: Converting Teaching into Scholarship

Ten Steps to Convert Basic Teaching into Publishable Scholarship

The purpose of scholarly teaching is to move beyond basic teaching, which is routine and non-changing.  Scholarly teaching is informed by pedagogical literature as well as student evaluations, peer evaluation, and self-reflection.  The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) goes beyond scholarly teaching by  disseminating  research findings to impact educational practice beyond one’s classroom walls and serves to bridge the gap between teaching and research roles of the academic. 

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#MedEdPearls October 2017: Coaching for Peak Performance

COACHING for peak professional performance is making a strong appearance in academic health science organizations.  But, use of the word coaching can be confusing with so many applications including life coaching, academic coaching, and peer coaching. 

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#MedEdPearls September 2017: Retrieval-based Learning

How do we help students make learning “stick”?  Retrieval-based learning may be the answer.  Purdue researcher Jeffrey Karpicke, PhD, studies how the mind and memory work and suggests that repeated, spaced retrieval leads to greater learning results.  This approach to learning could influence curriculum design, learning session organization, and assessment activities. 

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#MedEdPearls August 2017: How Adults Learn

When medical students matriculate they are somewhere between child (pedagogy) and adult (andragogy) learners.  We assume adults learn differently than children because they’ve had more life experiences, are motivated by their perceptions and personal needs, have an interest to direct their learning experiences, and have greater needs to apply learning in and to specific contexts.

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#MedEdPearls July 2017: Peer Observation

The Peer Observation of Teaching Handbook

A group of faculty developers have come together to carry on a tradition started by Steve Davis, to highlight faculty development resources and strategies each month.

This month we are highlighting a wonderful resource available in MedEdPortal, The Peer Observation of Teaching Handbook written by Lori R. Newman, David H. Roberts, and Richard M. Schwartzstein from Harvard Medical School (2012).  We are also hoping to extend an engaging conversation in Twitter at #MedEdPearls. 

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Gregg Wells

peer evaulation of online teac...

The Peer Observation of Teaching Handbook is a wonderful resource. As the blog post notes, The Peer Observation of Teaching Handb... Read More
Thursday, 13 July 2017 8:08 PM
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