Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

Inclusive Health Professions Education

Inclusive Learning

On April 5th, 2019, I had the pleasure of attending a workshop, “Building an Inclusive Classroom,” sponsored by the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning at Stanford University. The guest speaker was Sherryl Broverman, PhD, from the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke University Department of Biology. Everything that follows is credited to her and represents a tiny glimpse into her outstanding presentation.

The workshop started with the class divided into groups of 5-7 individuals that were given arts and crafts supplies and asked to complete a creative task. When finished, we compared our work between the tables and noticed striking differences. Dr. Broverman set the stage for our discussion by asking, “How do we organize our classrooms so that teaching activities, student performance, and evaluations don’t codify and reinforce existing privilege and social capital?”

Some students did not understand the prompt that described the assigned task.

Some groups were given more supplies than others. They completed more intricate and interesting crafts than groups with less resources.

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The Art of Education: The Harvard Macy Institute’s Art Museum-based Health Professions Education Fellowship

A foundational principle of the Harvard Macy Institute (HMI) is to build and nurture collaborations to foster cross disciplinary learning and problem solving. Early collaborations begun with the plans described in the 1994 successful grant submission to the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, which laid the foundation for our 26 year collaborations with faculty at the Harvard Medical School, the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Harvard Business School. The Macy Foundation’s assumption was that neither institution would be as successful working in isolation as they would be in partnership. This blog post tells the story of another fruitful collaboration - one in which health professions educators and museum educators collaborated to design a new fellowship, sponsored jointly with the Cambridge Health Alliance and now part of the HMI course portfolio.

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4 steps to revitalize a tired post-graduate curriculum

Since as early as the 1880s, psychologists studying human memory generated “forgetting curves” which attempt to illustrate memory retention over time. It is thought that adults retain less than 30% of lecture-based content which diminishes over time, and yet this is still a commonly used platform for teaching in medical education. At my institution, our radiology residents receive nearly two hours of dedicated teaching each day, at least half of which is lecture-based didactics. I vividly remember sitting through those 45-minute lectures as a resident, often after lunch, struggling to pry my eyes open. 

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ACGME 2019 Faculty Development Requirements

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) updated Common Program Requirements (CPRs) for faculty development in July 2019. Moving forward, all core faculty who educate, supervise, and evaluate trainees will be required to participate in at least four (4) faculty development areas annually: as educators; in quality improvement and patient safety; in fostering their own and their trainees’ well-being; and, in patient care based on their practice-based learning and improvement efforts.

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HMI Community Day 2019

The Harvard Macy Institute is a dedicated community of practice with more than 5600 alumni from 81 countries worldwide. We work hard to keep our community connected online, and one of our special initiatives is our annual #HMICommunity Day. This year, we celebrate 25 years of the Harvard Macy Institute with deepest gratitude to our worldwide community of healthcare professionals transforming education and healthcare delivery.

Please join us TODAY, August 13th for #HMICommunity Day - a virtual celebration of our worldwide community of practice! As alumni and friends, join us in showing support for our organization by tagging us in a photo and/or message on one of our three social media platforms – Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn – and letting us know what the Harvard Macy Institute means to you. Please tag all messages with our hashtag #HMICommunity, and the hashtag of courses you have attended - #HMIEducators, #HMIAssessment, #HMILeaders, or #HMIHCE.

Thank you for helping us celebrate our worldwide community!

 

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Educators have bought-in to the flipped classroom. But are our learners following suit?

I was flying to join my wife in San Diego, California while she was attending a conference on ocean planning. For those of you not familiar with ocean planning, it is the process of analyzing ocean resources and ocean use. The most important thing about it is that the people who do it usually have conferences in beautiful, often warm and always ocean-adjacent locations. I sat in my seat and reached for the airline magazine. The first article was about medical education and how many medical schools were switching to this new concept of the “flipped classroom.” It highlighted the University of Vermont as well as Harvard Medical School, and how they changed the old model of sitting in a large auditorium, listening for hours on end to someone who had incredible amounts of expertise and information, because they had found learners had trouble committing this information to long-term memory and applying it to new settings. How could this be? The lecture format is the tried and true educational experience. The idea of the “sage in the stage” started with the very advent of universities as far back as 1050 AD. This was the “way it was done.” Why then were these medical colleges completing overhauling the way they teach medicine?

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Use Instructional Design support to leverage your teaching experience

If you have not yet worked with an instructional designer, it may be worth exploring such a resource at your institution to leverage your teaching with the help of relevant technology to enhance the educational experience. With remarkable advancements in educational technologies over the last decade, most, if not all, educational interactions taking place today incorporate some form of digital interaction for students, staff and faculty. As of fall 2016, there were over 6.3 million students taking at least one distance education course, comprising 31.6% of all higher education enrollments. And specifically in nursing education, 82.9 percent of nursing students report that the use of technology enhances their learning, and 79.6 percent say that technology helps them better prepare for future careers. These technologies appear in many forms during the educational career of a health care professional -  whether it is the use of a learning management system (LMS), creating and interacting with video tutorials, participating in simulated scenarios, using different assessment tools, participating in peer evaluations …and the list goes on. Gaming tools and mixed reality applications are not far behind! As indicated by the recent 2019 Horizon Report, “mixed reality and artificial intelligence are forecast to be important to teaching, learning and creative inquiry in the future.”

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Peer Observation #MedEdPearls from #IAMSE19

At the 2019 IAMSE conference in Roanoke, Virginia a collaborative group of Central Group on Educational Affairs and Southern Group on Educational Affairs members facilitated an interactive workshop on implementing a Peer Observation of Instruction program. The process proposed is similar to the findings reported by Adriane Bell, Holly Meyer and Lauren Maggio this month in Teaching and Learning in Medicine. They found that most peer observation programs are voluntary and provide formative feedback with the sole purpose of teaching improvement. They also found that most programs use a three-phase process with a pre-observation meeting for goal setting, direct observation of teaching, and a post-observation meeting with feedback. The IAMSE workshop leveraged the Peer Observation of Teaching Handbook by Lori Newman, David Roberts, and Richard Schwartzstein.

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Implementing Collaborative Learning Methods

After reflecting on the two years we spent at the Harvard Macy Institute Program for Educators in the Health Professions course as learners and teachers, it became more apparent that health professions educators cannot just talk about collaborative learning methods. Instead, we must figure out a way to incorporate these pearls into our everyday practice to promote effective teaching and learning throughout the medical education continuum. During our time at the course, we have seen that by weaving collaborative learning methods into the delivery of education, knowledge is fostered, teamwork is promoted, and a true excitement for learning new concepts occurs. One challenge that may impede us from implementing collaborative learning methods into our own teaching strategies is lack of time; however, to be the change agents that healthcare needs, we have a duty to better prepare our learners for their future role as healthcare providers. How do we do this? The answer may not be that difficult. In fact, by using collaborative learning methods, you may find that students develop a deeper understanding as they practice synthesizing and applying healthcare concepts.

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Reflections on creating an Anatomy case-based e-learning module

A close look at history reveals that for centuries the format of lecture delivery has remained consistent. In the Middle Ages a lecturer usually read from notes while students listened attentively, took notes and tried to retain the content and later disseminate the notes. Fast-forward to the twentieth century; in the 1970’s with the discovery of slide films and overhead projectors, lecturers’ projected handwritten notes and drawings on slides to supplement their talks. In 1990 the birth of PowerPoint allowed educators to create slide shows. In all these scenarios, the delivery of the content and receipt of the information happened at the same time. This mode of delivery of content is called synchronous learning. In today’s E-learning era, synchronous learning morphed into on-line chats and video conferencing. An additional huge step forward was the birth of online learning management systems that allowed larger PowerPoint decks to be offered online. In these scenarios the content delivery and receipt of the information did not happen synchronously. The learners were responsible for pacing their own learning, a method of content delivery called asynchronous learning.

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Collaboration at its Best: Psychiatry Trainees Reflect on their Experience in the Harvard Macy Program for Post-Graduate Trainees

As five Psychiatry trainees, we had the exciting opportunity to meet one another at the 2018 Program for Post-Graduate Trainees: Future Academic Clinician-Educators, co-sponsored by the Harvard Macy Institute, the MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston Children’s Hospital, and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. We quickly realized that we all shared the same passion and zeal for medical education, working with trainees, and collaborative work! This enthusiasm resulted in the spontaneous decision to collaborate on a combined "Harvard-Yale" project for the annual American Psychiatric Association Meeting.

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Teaching First, Technology Second: Using Learning Theory to Make it Work (Easily)

Many of us have a love/hate relationship with technology, and it often involves standing in front of a bunch of intelligent students while technology fails us. As educators, how can we prevent this from happening? A recommendation is to choose your instructional strategy first, investigate the theory behind the strategy second, and then pick the technology that affords you benefits you would not get with the old methods. In this blog post, I offer strategies for doing this, and provide a short list of common strategies related to theory, then matched with technology benefits.

 

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Appreciative Advising: Advising with the Student in Mind

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine annual conference was packed full of thought-provoking sessions, including an interesting discussion on appreciative inquiry (specifically appreciative advising).

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Developing Leaders Through an International Collaboration: Introducing sanokondu

Many health care systems are faced with increased demands for safe and effective health care delivery as well as easier access to affordable health care services. These developments have resulted in the need for reform to the socioeconomic, political and medical educational agendas of several countries around the world. Central to these agendas is the need for leader and leadership development in medical training programs and integrating leadership education into the curricula of these diverse programs. Over time, educational frameworks have emerged in different countries to address this need for physician leadership education and many of them describe leadership using concepts like professionalism, communication, collaboration, advocacy and scholarship. Still, the process of reform and the implementation of leadership education proves to be difficult to achieve in the formal training programs of physicians. In this blog post, we introduce readers to sanokondu which is an international collaboration aimed at developing leaders within medicine globally.

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Designing Better Surveys for Education and Research

Health professions educators are increasingly engaged in educational scholarship. Many times, a survey is suggested as a way to collect data for scholarly activities related to teaching, learner assessment, program evaluation, and research, to name just a few. However, survey design is both an art and a science, and poorly designed surveys are unlikely to provide credible data. In this blog post, I offer six principles to guide the design and development of high-quality surveys in health professions education, with the ultimate goal of helping readers design better surveys for collecting better data.

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Medical Education and Global Health

As the Harvard Macy Institute and the field of health professions education have developed over the last 25 years, there has been a parallel growth in funding and scholarship within the equally multidisciplinary field of global health. Education and global health increasingly interconnect, and herein I discuss some of their fruitful crossings and lay out a vision of where the overlap between the two fields may lead.

 

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Microresistance

You have heard of microaggressions—“everyday subtle put downs directed towards a marginalized group which may be verbal or non-verbal and are typically automatic.” When these actions happen, whether in or out of the classroom, we’re often at a loss for how to address them.

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Reflections Across the Career Continuum, One Year Post-Harvard Macy

In 2018, Cathy Grossman and Lekshmi Santhosh completed the Harvard Macy Program for Educators in the Health Professions. They were frequent seat mates in the back row. While there, they discovered they were both Pulmonary and Critical Care trained – but at different places temporally in their careers. They were also both clinician educators, however Lekshmi was in her fellowship while Cathy was a decade out of fellowship. We thought it would be interesting to ask them some questions about their experience and how they were both able to apply their new knowledge at their home institutions, at two distinctly different points in their careers.

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Behind the Curtain with Vinny Arora & Nirvani Goolsarran: Bridging Leaders

Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation Faculty Scholar and 2018 Scholar Vineet Arora, M.D., recently accepted the new Associate Chief Medical Officer-Clinical Learning Environment role at the University of Chicago Medicine. Vineet previously worked in graduate medical education to improve the clinical learning environment for residents and fellows by aligning institutional priorities with the work that trainees do on a daily basis. She is expanding this work to the whole health system, in her role as a “bridging leader.” She recently completed the Program in Health Professions Educators with Nirvani Goolsarran, an Associate Internal Medicine Program Director at Stony Brook University Hospital who is also a bridging leader in quality and education and active in the growing bridging leader community. We thought it would be interesting to ask them some questions about bridging leaders and how they were able to apply their knowledge gained at the course to these new roles.

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Scholar Testimonials of the Leadership and Innovation in Health Professions Course, Melbourne, Australia 2019

Our fourth iteration of the Leadership and Innovation in Health course was successfully held in February 2019 at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

The Harvard Macy Institute, in collaboration with the Monash Institute for Health and Clinical Education brought together faculty and scholars from across Australia and internationally to share their expertise and innovative responses to global health care and education challenges.

The response from our scholars was overwhelmingly positive with many enthusiastically providing testimonials to celebrate their successful learnings from the course, and their anticipated changes to their practice from these learnings.

We are proud to welcome another group of motivated health care professionals to the Harvard Macy Institute global community of practice.

Click here to learn more about our course and register your interest for Leadership and Innovation in Health, Melbourne, Australia, February 10-14, 2020. 

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