Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

November #MedEdPearls: Trust Me – I’m a Doctor

Competency based medical education (CBME) is an outcomes-based time-independent concept that is informing curricular innovation across the country and beyond. The roll out of Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) has incited discussion about workplace-based assessment in the context of entrustment.

Continue reading
98 Hits
0 Comments

Making People Think at Grand Rounds

I recently had the opportunity to present at the Dell Medical School Palliative Care Grand Rounds. I was fresh from attending the Harvard Macy Institute Program for Educators in the Health Professions, and more fully aware of the significant learning benefits of an interactive lecture. I now had evidence that there are better ways to present material that would help people learn. Plus, I had experience as a learner that engaging, interactive lectures were just way more fun. Now I just had to figure out how to create one…

Continue reading
611 Hits
0 Comments

#HMIchat August 2019: Developing Leaders: Busting Myths and Lifelong Learning

Despite numerous calls for an increase in physician leaders and leadership development in medical education, a 2018 systematic review found significant gaps exist in (1) understanding the best ways to teach leadership, (2) assessing and understanding the value of leadership training, and (3) overall reporting of curricula design. Participants in the August #HMIchat explored myths of leadership and leadership development, shared crucial advice, passed on resources, and discussed innovative ways to teach and develop leadership skills both in and beyond medical education. The chat was rich with ideas and resources to help us become better leaders.

 Here is a recap of some of the common themes and ideas shared by our community.

What are some common myths about leadership?

  • Leaders cannot show vulnerability; they must have all the answers… be the smartest in the room (@joshuadhartzell)
  • Everyone has the same access to leadership opportunities. Reality: There remains incredible bias and sponsorship is one way to work to create equity in leadership (@SusanHingle)
  • You have to be an extrovert to be a leader (@KFabsMD)
  • Leaders can only lead after they have “done their time” (@DrJRMarcelin)

As we discussed these myths, @Javeedsukhera remarked how “many myths related to leadership perpetuate gender and racial biases...make us question our leadership skills and competencies because we don’t ‘look’ like leaders.” In busting these myths, the #HMIchat turned to the critical value of personal mentors, coaches and sponsors in developing leaders, especially for women and minorities.

What are some common myths about teaching leadership:  

...
Continue reading
590 Hits
0 Comments

Education as a Catalyst for Health Care Transformation

Improving community and population health is in the core mission statement of many medical schools. However, physician training happens within the same system that has led the United States to disproportionately spend on its healthcare system. While wealthy countries like the U.S., tend to spend more per person on health care and related expenses than lower income countries. However, the U.S. spends more per person on health than comparable countries. Health spending per person in the U.S. was $10,224 in 2017, which was 28% higher than Switzerland, the next highest per capita spender.  The all-encompassing social determinants of health, politics, and vested financial interests heavily influence policies affecting population health. It would be useful for us to take a moment reflect upon the problem.

Continue reading
878 Hits
0 Comments

Interprofessional Education: Who is buzzing at your planning table?

For the past two years, I have been deeply involved in interprofessional education and collaboration efforts at Cleveland Clinic. As an instructional designer by training, I strive to engage all stakeholders any time I am designing educational programming. This is particularly important when your audiences are from a number of professions, with a wide range of expertise level and diverse views on the need for learning.

Continue reading
341 Hits
0 Comments

October #MedEdPearls: Resources to ease MCQ test writing anxiety

School is back in full swing, and it is a good time for refreshing multiple-choice question (MCQ) exams. Download the following one-page guide for 5 basic steps of item writing.

Continue reading
562 Hits
0 Comments

Removing the Sage from the Stage: Blending Case- and Problem- Based Learning in Graduate Biomedical Research Education

Though those trained in business, law, and medicine are no strangers to active learning techniques in the classroom, scholars in graduate biomedical research programs are still frequently taught using passive lecture-based techniques. This is challenging for many pre-doctoral and master’s level students, who will spend the bulk of their training years conducting inquiry-based research. They are inherently curious and learn best through hands-on techniques. I say this as an individual for whom a single case-based course during my graduate biomedical research training not only vastly improved my educational experience as a student, but also dramatically changed my views on what biomedical research education was and could be.

Continue reading
456 Hits
0 Comments

“Good job, read more:” Making positive feedback truly positive

When I see “good job, read more” on a learner’s assessment form, I chuckle because I have most certainly received that feedback before, as have many other health professional trainees. To some educators, this appears to be effective reinforcing feedback, but a larger number of educators cringe on seeing that phrase, because neither did it take much effort to write those four words, nor does this feedback help a learner improve and grow.

Continue reading
761 Hits
0 Comments

Jumping down the rabbit hole: Questions to chase in medical education

For some time now, I have been contemplating the kinds of questions we ask in health professions education (HPE). These ruminations began in 2010 when I was working on a paper about my medical school’s efforts to implement an educational innovation. Truth be told, I had a real problem. My study was supposed to be an evaluation of the innovation’s implementation; however, the data highlighted all the workarounds we constructed to make the innovation fit within our contextual constraints. How could I evaluate our implementation of the innovation when I was no longer confident that what we had implemented was still an exemplar of the original innovation?I found myself asking questions like: Why do we value this innovation? Why is our implementation an example of the innovation at work? How much can I change the innovation before I turn it into something else?

I started searching the literature to find insights into these questions. Surely other HPE scholars have had similar concerns. Surely I would not be the first to venture down this rabbit hole. Right

Continue reading
1106 Hits
1 Comment

September #MedEdPearl – Small Group Instructional Diagnosis

Even though it seems classes just started, it is time to prepare for mid-semester evaluations. Unlike evaluations at the end of the semester, mid-semester evaluations are great tools to provide feedback to the instructor in time for adjustments to be made. This semester, consider a SGID—Small Group Instructional Diagnosis. A SGID is a short, 20-minute formative assessment activity that involves having a trained facilitator meet with student focus groups to discuss what’s working, what needs improvement, possible changes to the course, and how students see they are meeting course learning objectives. 

Continue reading
463 Hits
0 Comments

Inclusive Health Professions Education

Inclusive Learning

On April 5th, 2019, I had the pleasure of attending a workshop, “Building an Inclusive Classroom,” sponsored by the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning at Stanford University. The guest speaker was Sherryl Broverman, PhD, from the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke University Department of Biology. Everything that follows is credited to her and represents a tiny glimpse into her outstanding presentation.

The workshop started with the class divided into groups of 5-7 individuals that were given arts and crafts supplies and asked to complete a creative task. When finished, we compared our work between the tables and noticed striking differences. Dr. Broverman set the stage for our discussion by asking, “How do we organize our classrooms so that teaching activities, student performance, and evaluations don’t codify and reinforce existing privilege and social capital?”

Some students did not understand the prompt that described the assigned task.

Some groups were given more supplies than others. They completed more intricate and interesting crafts than groups with less resources.

...
Continue reading
1136 Hits
0 Comments

The Art of Education: The Harvard Macy Institute’s Art Museum-based Health Professions Education Fellowship

A foundational principle of the Harvard Macy Institute (HMI) is to build and nurture collaborations to foster cross disciplinary learning and problem solving. Early collaborations begun with the plans described in the 1994 successful grant submission to the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, which laid the foundation for our 26 year collaborations with faculty at the Harvard Medical School, the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Harvard Business School. The Macy Foundation’s assumption was that neither institution would be as successful working in isolation as they would be in partnership. This blog post tells the story of another fruitful collaboration - one in which health professions educators and museum educators collaborated to design a new fellowship, sponsored jointly with the Cambridge Health Alliance and now part of the HMI course portfolio.

Continue reading
1050 Hits
0 Comments

4 steps to revitalize a tired post-graduate curriculum

Since as early as the 1880s, psychologists studying human memory generated “forgetting curves” which attempt to illustrate memory retention over time. It is thought that adults retain less than 30% of lecture-based content which diminishes over time, and yet this is still a commonly used platform for teaching in medical education. At my institution, our radiology residents receive nearly two hours of dedicated teaching each day, at least half of which is lecture-based didactics. I vividly remember sitting through those 45-minute lectures as a resident, often after lunch, struggling to pry my eyes open. 

Continue reading
771 Hits
0 Comments

ACGME 2019 Faculty Development Requirements

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) updated Common Program Requirements (CPRs) for faculty development in July 2019. Moving forward, all core faculty who educate, supervise, and evaluate trainees will be required to participate in at least four (4) faculty development areas annually: as educators; in quality improvement and patient safety; in fostering their own and their trainees’ well-being; and, in patient care based on their practice-based learning and improvement efforts.

Continue reading
900 Hits
0 Comments

HMI Community Day 2019

The Harvard Macy Institute is a dedicated community of practice with more than 5600 alumni from 81 countries worldwide. We work hard to keep our community connected online, and one of our special initiatives is our annual #HMICommunity Day. This year, we celebrate 25 years of the Harvard Macy Institute with deepest gratitude to our worldwide community of healthcare professionals transforming education and healthcare delivery.

Please join us TODAY, August 13th for #HMICommunity Day - a virtual celebration of our worldwide community of practice! As alumni and friends, join us in showing support for our organization by tagging us in a photo and/or message on one of our three social media platforms – Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn – and letting us know what the Harvard Macy Institute means to you. Please tag all messages with our hashtag #HMICommunity, and the hashtag of courses you have attended - #HMIEducators, #HMIAssessment, #HMILeaders, or #HMIHCE.

Thank you for helping us celebrate our worldwide community!

 

...
Continue reading
337 Hits
0 Comments

Educators have bought-in to the flipped classroom. But are our learners following suit?

I was flying to join my wife in San Diego, California while she was attending a conference on ocean planning. For those of you not familiar with ocean planning, it is the process of analyzing ocean resources and ocean use. The most important thing about it is that the people who do it usually have conferences in beautiful, often warm and always ocean-adjacent locations. I sat in my seat and reached for the airline magazine. The first article was about medical education and how many medical schools were switching to this new concept of the “flipped classroom.” It highlighted the University of Vermont as well as Harvard Medical School, and how they changed the old model of sitting in a large auditorium, listening for hours on end to someone who had incredible amounts of expertise and information, because they had found learners had trouble committing this information to long-term memory and applying it to new settings. How could this be? The lecture format is the tried and true educational experience. The idea of the “sage in the stage” started with the very advent of universities as far back as 1050 AD. This was the “way it was done.” Why then were these medical colleges completing overhauling the way they teach medicine?

Continue reading
901 Hits
0 Comments

Use Instructional Design support to leverage your teaching experience

If you have not yet worked with an instructional designer, it may be worth exploring such a resource at your institution to leverage your teaching with the help of relevant technology to enhance the educational experience. With remarkable advancements in educational technologies over the last decade, most, if not all, educational interactions taking place today incorporate some form of digital interaction for students, staff and faculty. As of fall 2016, there were over 6.3 million students taking at least one distance education course, comprising 31.6% of all higher education enrollments. And specifically in nursing education, 82.9 percent of nursing students report that the use of technology enhances their learning, and 79.6 percent say that technology helps them better prepare for future careers. These technologies appear in many forms during the educational career of a health care professional -  whether it is the use of a learning management system (LMS), creating and interacting with video tutorials, participating in simulated scenarios, using different assessment tools, participating in peer evaluations …and the list goes on. Gaming tools and mixed reality applications are not far behind! As indicated by the recent 2019 Horizon Report, “mixed reality and artificial intelligence are forecast to be important to teaching, learning and creative inquiry in the future.”

Continue reading
637 Hits
0 Comments

Peer Observation #MedEdPearls from #IAMSE19

At the 2019 IAMSE conference in Roanoke, Virginia a collaborative group of Central Group on Educational Affairs and Southern Group on Educational Affairs members facilitated an interactive workshop on implementing a Peer Observation of Instruction program. The process proposed is similar to the findings reported by Adriane Bell, Holly Meyer and Lauren Maggio this month in Teaching and Learning in Medicine. They found that most peer observation programs are voluntary and provide formative feedback with the sole purpose of teaching improvement. They also found that most programs use a three-phase process with a pre-observation meeting for goal setting, direct observation of teaching, and a post-observation meeting with feedback. The IAMSE workshop leveraged the Peer Observation of Teaching Handbook by Lori Newman, David Roberts, and Richard Schwartzstein.

Continue reading
578 Hits
0 Comments

Implementing Collaborative Learning Methods

After reflecting on the two years we spent at the Harvard Macy Institute Program for Educators in the Health Professions course as learners and teachers, it became more apparent that health professions educators cannot just talk about collaborative learning methods. Instead, we must figure out a way to incorporate these pearls into our everyday practice to promote effective teaching and learning throughout the medical education continuum. During our time at the course, we have seen that by weaving collaborative learning methods into the delivery of education, knowledge is fostered, teamwork is promoted, and a true excitement for learning new concepts occurs. One challenge that may impede us from implementing collaborative learning methods into our own teaching strategies is lack of time; however, to be the change agents that healthcare needs, we have a duty to better prepare our learners for their future role as healthcare providers. How do we do this? The answer may not be that difficult. In fact, by using collaborative learning methods, you may find that students develop a deeper understanding as they practice synthesizing and applying healthcare concepts.

Continue reading
777 Hits
0 Comments

Reflections on creating an Anatomy case-based e-learning module

A close look at history reveals that for centuries the format of lecture delivery has remained consistent. In the Middle Ages a lecturer usually read from notes while students listened attentively, took notes and tried to retain the content and later disseminate the notes. Fast-forward to the twentieth century; in the 1970’s with the discovery of slide films and overhead projectors, lecturers’ projected handwritten notes and drawings on slides to supplement their talks. In 1990 the birth of PowerPoint allowed educators to create slide shows. In all these scenarios, the delivery of the content and receipt of the information happened at the same time. This mode of delivery of content is called synchronous learning. In today’s E-learning era, synchronous learning morphed into on-line chats and video conferencing. An additional huge step forward was the birth of online learning management systems that allowed larger PowerPoint decks to be offered online. In these scenarios the content delivery and receipt of the information did not happen synchronously. The learners were responsible for pacing their own learning, a method of content delivery called asynchronous learning.

Continue reading
798 Hits
2 Comments