Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

#MedEdPearls November 2017: Converting Teaching into Scholarship

Ten Steps to Convert Basic Teaching into Publishable Scholarship

The purpose of scholarly teaching is to move beyond basic teaching, which is routine and non-changing.  Scholarly teaching is informed by pedagogical literature as well as student evaluations, peer evaluation, and self-reflection.  The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) goes beyond scholarly teaching by  disseminating  research findings to impact educational practice beyond one’s classroom walls and serves to bridge the gap between teaching and research roles of the academic. 

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#HMIchat October 2017: “Learners-as-Educators

 

The Caffe Nero on Longwood Avenue couldn’t have been a more perfect place to reflect with Teresa Soro and Elissa Hall on the October #HMIChat I moderated, and not just because of the great lattes. October’s chat on “Learners-as-Educators” discussed how to develop health professions learners at every level into teachers themselves. I love the pay-it-forward nature of this idea, that everyone has something to contribute to and to inspire the next generation of learners. It had been at Caffe Nero that I decided--as a trainee--to dedicate my career to medical education, so returning there to talk about this topic resonated deeply.

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Holistic Review: Fad or Future of Medical School Admissions?

Holistic admission policies have been utilized for decades by undergraduate institutions. Instead of solely relying on test scores and a grade point average to select students, holistic admission policies provide admission committees the latitude to admit students who can meet the academic rigors of the institution while embodying the school’s mission through personal characteristics and experiences. This type of admission policy has moved into the graduate and professional school arena. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the “Advancing the Holistic Review Initiative” was established in 2007 and promotes the review of the medical school application through the evaluation of metrics, attributes, and experiences. A 2014 report, “Holistic Admissions in the Health Professions,” found an increase in the number of professional schools, specifically those offering health-related programs, that subscribe to a holistic admission policy (para. 8). It is widely believed that holistic admission practices diversify the institution’s student body. 

Recent Comments
Guest — Terry Hill, PHD

Vetting to the extreme?

I question whether dumping more screening criteria at applicants is efficacious. Basic aptitudes and motivation trumps most measur... Read More
Sunday, 29 October 2017 12:12 PM
Guest — Terry Hill, PhD

Vetting to the extreme?

Too much does not standardize towards the mean. The emphasis has to be relocated onto basic aptitudes and motivation measures.
Sunday, 29 October 2017 12:12 PM
Michelle L Schmude

Thanks

Thanks for your comments Terry.
Monday, 30 October 2017 2:02 PM
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Digital Natives in Medical School: Reflections of a…Digital Native?

It’s a beautiful Wednesday in Boston, and, more importantly, day four of the 2017 edition of the Harvard Macy Institute: Health Care Education 2.0 course. My feelings of imposter syndrome are just starting to fade as the faculty and scholars, leaders in and pioneers of medical education from around the world, welcome me, a medical student and millennial, into their ranks. Powered by a shared desire to improve medical education, inspiring company, and, of course, plenty of coffee, we are all discovering how technology can enhance the way we learn and teach. But for just a brief moment, I wanted to take a step back and think about our audience, the end-user, the learner, and share my personal take on how the idea of “digital nativism” has impacted my journey through medical education so far.

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Felipe Piza

Thanks

Interesting article Julian! Thanks for sending this
Wednesday, 18 October 2017 3:03 PM
Christine L. Mai

Perspectives

Great article Julian. Thanks for sharing your perspectives.
Wednesday, 18 October 2017 3:03 PM
Wenxia (Joy) Wu

Perspectives

Thank you for sharing! I do not think there is a gap digital natives versus digital immigrants. The biggest factor behind people's... Read More
Wednesday, 18 October 2017 3:03 PM
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The Accidental Academic: Bridging the Gap between Town and Gown

In the Middle Ages, students studying at European universities adopted the practice of wearing long black gowns. Not only did these gowns serve the practical purpose of keeping the students warm as they studied in unheated buildings, they were also a social symbol in that they were unsuited for doing manual labor. The distinctive gowns effectively distinguished students at academic institutions from the rest of the townspeople, giving rise to the phrase “town and gown.” In modern times, town and gown has often been used to reference the unfortunate tensions that can arise between college students and the surrounding community when there is a perceived gap between values and culture. Three years ago, I made my own transition from town to gown when I left my community practice to become faculty at a new medical school. As I simultaneously tried to adapt to academia while my medical school tried to integrate into the surrounding community, I began to reflect on what it means to be ‘academic’ versus ‘non-academic’ and how clinicians of both types interact.

 

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Vijaya (VJ) Iragavarapu-Charyulu

Town & Gown

Interesting article. I learned a new term, "Town & Gown". You are absolutely correct in transitions and learning new skills. I was... Read More
Monday, 04 December 2017 11:11 PM
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